Gaby Montejo

Gaby Montejo approaches art through photo, actions, music, interviews, and temporary installation. In often a performative style, Gaby explores democracy and hierarchy in a way where the finished work is normally not sold and hung, but instead, consumed. Gaby exhibits internationally while staying pivotal in the social initiatives and collaborative interventions of Christchurch. Originally from Cuban origins, Gaby was art-schooled in America and Australia.

www.artemontejo.com

 

Shared Lines: Pūtahitanga 2020

Everyone keeps suggesting you stop- and focus on the breath.


What's your current flavour?


Ever exhale after consuming too much?


...or vomit, just a little?

Mā fox still lavas you.

 

Shared Lines: Wellington 2017 / Kaikōura 2019

West is North (2016) GIF Stills

 

Shared Lines: Christchurch / Sendai 2012 - 2013

HOW TO RUB ELBOW WITH WHITE BOO (2020) Tyvek fibres, milk, papertowel

Coming from a family of Cuban refugees, Gaby began art studies in Miami, then graduated honours with dual degrees in Sculpture and Art Education from Virginia Commonwealth University. He has been awarded numerous scholarships, attending the Santa Fe Art Institute in New Mexico, Anderson Ranch in Colorado, and been artist-in-residence at other locations in America including the Millay Colony, New York.

 

Thanks to a generous fellowship from the Virginia Museum of Fine Art, he gained his postgraduate degree from Sydney College of the Arts and later immigrated to Christchurch. After teaching art for many years he has come to the University of Canterbury’s School of Fine Arts to manage their workshop. 

J. Gabriel Montejo “Gaby” is an interdisciplinary artist who often tends towards foods as his art media of choice- being attracted mostly to their ability to change over time.  He has worked using melons, oranges, pumpkins, bread, cheese, meats, bananas, and carrots along with a wide range of other materials and methods.

 

The ideas explored in his practice usually concern issues of hierarchy… a dominant thing trying to have control over something lesser.