Kyla Cresswell

Leucadendron II (2019) Watercolour and Graphite on Hahnemuehle Paper 240x355mm


Kyla Cresswell grew up in Invercargill and studied printmaking at the Otago School of Art. Years of travel saw her influenced by the aesthetics of Japan and inspired by the minimal wintery landscapes of Europe and Canada.

“In my work, I hope to convey the impression of an environment, the feeling of a place, a slice of time. I am consistently drawn to trees in my art making. Growing up in Invercargill, it was the southern coastline that first sparked my ongoing interest in nature topiarised by extreme conditions. My work frequently responds to an environmental concern, from the denuding of land by forestry and agriculture to a diminishing natural landscape and changed habitats. Moving between the scratchy lines of drypoint, the crisp emboss of woodcut to the soft tones of mezzotint, I enjoy the unique mark making and visual effects that these handmade printmaking techniques allow.”

“My work often explores the physical impact of the elements on the natural environment, the fragility of this environment and the consequences of our occupation. In the creation of my prints, I strive to find a sense of stillness and show a quiet celebration of the natural world.”

Kyla works predominantly in drypoint, mezzotint and woodcut from her studio on Wellington’s southeast coast.

 

www.kylacresswell.com
 

 

Shared Lines: Pūtahitanga 2020

Considering communication during lockdown I realise how highly I regard creative offerings. Like a handmade card, a thank you note, a posy of congratulations. Small ways to communicate connection. In lockdown this didn’t seem possible, the traces of touch too close to breaking the bubble.

As the lockdown eased I returned to my part-time floristry job. Near and far, we communicated love, loss, comfort, joy and congratulations through flowers. I was calmed by nature and the seasons marching on despite the state of turmoil. We were still not allowed in each others’ bubbles, yet I was off delivering bouquets. Bunches carefully placed in a tray by a florist who then backed away 2 metres, I advanced, picked them up, loaded them for delivery, placed them on a doorstep, knocked and backed away. A blossom or bud coming into our homes to communicate feeling where friends and family couldn’t.

 

Shared Lines: Wellington 2017 &

Shared Lines: Kaikōura 2019

Matsu III – Wellington (2017) Drypoint, 470x455mm 

Growth – Wellington (2015) Intaglio Woodcut 270x230mm 

Kyla’s delicate yet powerful work explores the impact of the elements on the environment, and the consequences of human occupation of the land. She strives to find a sense of stillness and a quiet celebration of nature. 


“My work often explores the physical impact of the elements on the natural environment, the fragility of this environment and the consequences of our occupation. In the creation of my prints, I strive to find a sense of stillness and show a quiet celebration of the natural world.”